Interprofessional Approach to Health
This doctoral seminar exposes students to major theories and research about the process of interprofessional collaboration and looks at the features of successful interprofessional teams and team leaders.  This course will also give students the opportunity to delve into specific topics in the literature on interprofessional collaboration that will inform their chosen specialty area of study in the OTD program.
 
Teaching in Higher Education
This course prepares students for the role of teaching in graduate programs and courses. Students will learn how to develop syllabi, course content, and course assessment. Instructional methods and strategies for dealing with student issues will also be covered. All students will have the opportunity to guest lecture in the Salus MSOT program as part of this course.
 
Advanced Occupation-Based Perspectives
This course examines the multifaceted aspects of human occupations. It will include perspectives from Occupational Science, Ecological Models of Occupation, the Model of Human Occupation, and the Canadian Models of Occupational Performance and Engagement, and PEO.  The course will emphasize strength-based approaches, including enablement, relevant positive psychological constructs and interpersonal influences that facilitate participation in the clients’ meaningful roles and occupations. Participation a key component of health from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and will be described as well as environmental factors of this model. 
 
Doctoral Capstone Design
This course is designed to prepare the student for the OTD Capstone project (see Capstone Implementation below). Topics will cover basic research methods such as the  process  of searching, evaluating and synthesizing relevant research literature, developing a research question from literature or from practice, learning how to systematically collect and code data (qualitatively or quantitatively) and selecting an appropriate data analysis method. A variety of capstone options will be outlined,  including 1) an advanced original systematic review (such as a Critical Appraisal Topics, CAT to contribute to AOTA evidence based practice data base), 2) planning, developing and evaluating a new program or manual (alpha and beta testing it) or 3) conducting research (qualitative or quantitative) with a faculty mentor/researcher.  
 
Capstone Mentoring
Once the capstone mentor is assigned (and consents to the proposal), she/he will help the student refine and guide the project development and implementation to the final presentation.
 
The Capstone Implementation
This course links closely with the Doctoral Capstone Project course which precedes it. The content emphasis for this course will focus on a) developing a capstone proposal, and  b) learning methods for data analysis or program assessment/outcomes. Students will go through the IRB process as part of this course.
 
Grant Writing and Disseminating Scholarship
How do you submit your capstone for publication or apply for grant funding to continue your project? This course will introduce students to the process of bringing their capstone work to the scholarly community. As part of this course, students will create a proposal or document that can be submitted to a conference, grant agency, or journal. This course is closely correlated to the Capstone Project and Capstone Implementation courses.

SPECIALTY TRACK COURSES

Remedial Vision Rehabilitation Track
 
  1. Understanding Visual Deficits and Their Relationship to Occupation: This course is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of the anatomy, physiology of the visual system and an understanding on the 3 - component model of vision, and the relationship between vision and occupation. The literature will be explored relative to the prevalence of vision problems in both the pediatric population and the acquired brain injury population. Important topical areas about vision in the pediatric and acquired brain injury populations will be explored.
  2. Vision Testing/Screening: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history of vision screening and how to select appropriate screening tests. A battery of vision screening tests appropriate for both the pediatric and acquired brain injury populations will be presented.  Students will be required to perform each screening test on a minimum of 3 subjects.
  3. Remedial Vision Rehab 1: Visual Integrity and Visual Efficiency Problems: This course is designed to prepare students to provide remedial vision rehabilitation (vision therapy) for visual efficiency problems while working with optometrists. The course will begin with a complete review of the various treatment modalities available to eyecare professionals when treating both visual integrity and visual efficiency problems in the pediatric and acquired brain injury populations. The history of vision therapy will be explored and areas of controversy will be discussed. Students will be required to review the literature to understand the current evidence about the effectiveness of vision therapy for various visual efficiency problems. Students will have an intensive 5-day, on-site workshop designed to provide them with experience performing remedial vision rehabilitation. When returning home, students will be required to perform each vision therapy technique with a minimum of 2 subjects.  (Intensive/On Campus)
  4. Remedial Vision Rehab 2: Eye Movement And Visual Information Processing Problems: This course is designed to prepare students to provide remedial vision rehabilitation (vision therapy) for eye movement, visual information processing, and visual field loss problems while working with optometrists. The course will begin with a complete review of the various treatment modalities available to eyecare professionals when treating eye movement, visual information processing, and visual field problems in the pediatric and acquired brain injury populations. Students will be required to review the literature to understand the current evidence about the effectiveness of vision therapy visual information processing problems. Students will have an intensive 5-day, on-site workshop designed to provide them with experience performing remedial vision rehabilitation. When returning home, students will be required to perform each vision therapy technique with a minimum of 2 subjects.  (Intensive/On Campus)
Low Vision Rehabilitation Track
 
  1. Diseases and Disorders of the Visual System and Their Functional Implications: This course examines the anatomy and physiology of the visual system, including vision development, a three-component model of vision, and the relationship between vision and occupation.  Students learn about the elements of primary care and low vision eye examinations, including those for individuals with multiple impairments.  Emphasis is placed on functional interpretation of eye reports and functional implications of common low vision diseases and disorders of the eye as each relates to performance in everyday home, school, work and leisure settings.
  2. Low Vision Evaluation and Treatment 1: This hybrid course (intensive/on-campus) examines various methods for evaluating low vision, including interprofessional models and settings for low vision service delivery, professional vision screening tools and functional vision assessment procedures across the age span.  Students learn how to perform and report on functional visual acuity, functional visual field, and functional vision performance as they relate to activities of daily living of individuals with low vision.  Emphasis is also placed on assessing functional vision performance of individuals, including those with multiple disabilities, as well as on techniques for simulating and enhancing functional vision performance at lower and higher levels of visual development. Students review evidence-based low vision literature and discuss pros and cons of various assessment/evaluation tools and procedures.
  3. Low Vision Evaluation and Treatment 2: This hybrid course (intensive/on-campus) focuses on low vision rehabilitation intervention techniques with optical and non-optical devices.  Topics such as lighting, basic optics related to the eye, refractive errors, lenses and specialized low vision magnification and visual enhancement devices are addressed, with emphasis on their use and intervention strategies and adaptations promoting school, home, leisure and occupational performance. Students learn to assess and modify environments to enhance visual functioning, as well as specialized techniques for health promotion, including diabetes self-management. Students review evidence-based low vision habilitation and rehabilitation literature and discuss pros and cons of various instructional approaches with different ages.
  4. Special Topics in Low Vision Rehabilitation:* This course addresses a variety of specialized topics in low vision rehabilitation, including a review of state-of-the-art prosthetic (artificial) vision technology, implantable telescopic systems and driving with low vision.  Students learn about referral systems for individuals with low vision, as well as visit and interact with consumers and consumer advocacy organizations. Research and specialized assessments and intervention strategies for reading with low vision are addressed. Students learn about referral systems for individuals with low vision, as well as visit and interact with consumers and consumer advocacy organizations. Research and specialized assessments and intervention strategies for reading with low vision are addressed. Students also learn about the psychosocial implications of vision impairment and living with low vision. Financial resources and coding for low vision services, as well as community support groups and assistance systems for persons with low vision are also covered in this eclectic course to assist OT professionals working in clinical settings or as independent consultants working in client personal and occupation settings.
* Students choosing the Low Vision specialty track only take an additional 1-3 credit hours (amount will be individually determined, based on experience and current work setting) which consists of mentored patient contact in order to implement new clinically relevant knowledge.

Health and Wellness Track
 
  1. Health & Wellness Across the Life Cycle: This doctoral seminar will examine major theories and research on bio-psycho-social health and wellness across the lifespan from childhood, through adulthood (relationship/family development, work years, and changing women's health needs), post-work life including new conceptualizations of healthy retirements.  These holistic perspectives will be integrated with Occupational Therapy conceptual models and practice, including lifestyle redesign, chronic illness self-management, as well as relevant complementary and integrative practices, and processes that will enable positive change. Exploration of the health and wellness needs and vulnerabilities of people with disability or at-risk for disability will be included, with related concepts from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.
  2. Global and Cultural Perspectives of Health and Health Policy: This course provides students with an overview of global health and health policy and focuses on the social, economic and environmental factors that impact the health of populations around the world. Health problems discussed include, but are not limited to, malnutrition, injury, disasters, mental health disorders and chronic diseases.  Emphasis is on the epidemiology of global health issues, and the policies and interventions that address these concerns.  The role of the occupational therapist in global and population health is stressed throughout the course.
  3. Health Promotion in Groups, Communities & Populations: This course is designed to provide student with concepts of community health and health promotion, as well as population prevention strategies. Integration of epidemiological research with principles of collaboration, building partnerships, life style strategies. and coalition development will be covered. Specific needs of certain groups or communities particularly those with disabilities or chronic illnesses who occupational therapists treat will be discussed.  There will be site-visiting of several unique health and wellness enhancing settings for people with disabilities such as museums, a breastfeeding resource center (women's health), playgrounds and community centers. (Intensive/On-Campus)
  4. Innovative Occupational Therapy Health and Wellness Practices: This class is designed to explore contemporary health and wellness opportunities and envision future possibilities for Occupational Therapists (OT) brought about changes in the health care funding landscape and society. Some of the topics will explore occupational therapy opportunities in primary care, defining the OT role in self-management of chronic conditions, ergonomics advances, innovative community accessibility initiatives for children and families, transitional service and support for people with developmental disabilities or aging in place, and technology.  This on-campus intensive course has taken students to an innovative interdisciplinary primary care site, a rehabilitation center with advanced robotics, cutting edge accessible museums/planning playgrounds for children/families with disabilities, and progressive community services for young adults with disabilities.