Gross Anatomy
CHS-PAS-5001-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture and Lab | 3.00 credits
Provides Physician Assistant students with an extensive background in gross human anatomy through lecture, laboratory and independent learning exercises. Presentations include discussions of the embryologic basis for common clinical findings. Course has a clinical emphasis. Lectures and labs emphasize anatomy and anatomic relationships significant to common clinical medicine topics and surgical procedures.

Medical Microbiology and Genetics
CHS-PAS-5002-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

This course provides a systematic organ-based review of infectious disease agents and the principles and techniques employed in their laboratory diagnosis. It explores the protective mechanisms and response by the immune system in mounting defenses against common pathogens encountered in clinical practice. The course also introduces the basic concepts of genetics, inheritance patterns, genetic testing and screening and will correlate the effects of genetic alterations to clinical disease.

Behavioral Science
CHS-PAS-5003-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.50 credits

Covers the normal and abnormal psychological development of pediatric, adult and geriatric patients. Uses lectures and readings to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the understanding of, communication with, and counseling of patients and their families in the following areas: health promotion and disease prevention; eating disorders; substance abuse; human sexuality; response to illness, injury, and stress; principles of violence identification and prevention (child, spouse, elder); genetic inheritance of disease; geriatrics; end of life issues. Case studies are presented to enhance student learning.

Pediatrics
CHS-PAS-5004-AA (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 1.50 credit
Introduction to the most common health problems affecting the pediatric patient, from the newborn period through adolescence. Lectures focus on health promotion, disease prevention and screening, pathology identification and management, and patient education and counseling for the pediatric patient and his/her family.

Surgery 
CHS-PAS-5005-AA (Second Year, Summer Term) | Lecture | 1.00 credit
Designed to prepare the student for the General Surgery rotation.  General surgical concepts needed for the Physician Assistant to function in major surgical areas as well as primary care settings are presented. The course emphasizes surgical techniques and procedures, as well as asepsis, minor procedures, and anesthesia.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 1
CHS-PAS-5030-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 3.00 credits
Provides a foundation for the study of diseases in the Clinical Medicine courses and begins with basic science modules in cellular physiology, biochemistry, pathology, and immunology. Students learn about organ systems with presentations emphasizing normal physiology of each system, followed by the pathophysiology of diseases important to that system. For each system, lecturers discuss normal function, cellular changes and pathological changes, including inflammatory aspects, infectious conditions and any neoplastic presentations where appropriate. In addition, an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie disease processes and diagnostic tests is also be included.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 2
CHS-PAS-5031-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.50 credits
This course is the second of three sequential courses that provides instruction in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of disease as it pertains to the following systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, gastrointestinal and reproductive. The course integrates basic science concepts related to cellular physiology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, genetics and immunology. The normal physiologic changes associated with pregnancy are also explored. Diagnostic modalities are introduced where applicable. Organ system modules are aligned with those in the Clinical Medicine, Physical Diagnosis and Pharmacology courses.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 3
CHS-PAS-5032-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 2.00 credits
This course is the third of three sequential courses that provides instruction in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of disease as it pertains to the following systems: renal/urinary and neurologic. The course integrates basic science concepts related to cellular physiology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, genetics and immunology. The normal physiologic changes associated with aging are also explored. Diagnostic modalities are introduced where applicable. Organ system modules are aligned with those in the Clinical Medicine, Physical Diagnosis and Pharmacology courses.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 1
CHS-PAS-5040-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

First of three courses in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics. Introduces students to the general principles of pharmacology and the application of these principles to patient care situations. Students learn the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, dosage forms and dose-response relationships. Classes of pharmaceuticals will be studied, with a focus on the mechanisms of drug action in different therapeutic classes, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions, the interaction of drugs with the disease state under treatment, polypharmacy, and reputable sources of information about drugs. The classes of pharmaceuticals will parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 1.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 2 
CHS-PAS-5041-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

Second of a three-course series, teaches the principles of pharmacology and how to apply these principles to patient care situations.  Focus is on mechanisms of drug action in different therapeutic classes, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions, the interaction of drugs with the disease state under treatment, polypharmacy, and reputable sources of information about drugs. The classes of pharmaceuticals will parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 2.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 3
CHS-PAS-5042-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

Final course in a three-course series. Continues to teach the principles of pharmacology and how to apply these principles to patient care situations. Focus is on mechanisms of drug action in different therapeutic classes, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions, the interaction of drugs with the disease state under treatment, polypharmacy, and reputable sources of information about drugs. The classes of pharmaceuticals will parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 3.

Clinical Problem Solving 1
CHS-PAS-5050-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 3.50 credits
The focus of this course will be to synthesize and practice the theoretical and practical aspects of critical thinking involved in the process of clinical problem solving. Through the application of self-discovery and through integration of clinical reasoning utilizing all knowledge and skills already obtained, students will continue to solve problems that are frequently encountered in the day-to-day practice of medicine. In large and small group settings, a problem-based learning (PBL) format will be used to accomplish this goal. This class will apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned across the curriculum to individual patient cases. Throughout the year, the cases presented will relate to the organ system being studied in the Physiology and Pathophysiology, Clinical Medicine, and Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics courses.
Beginning in CPS 1, students will be involved in weekly “pre-clinical” experiences. The experiences will have a primary care focus, but will also expose the students to specialty practice and other ancillary services of medicine.  Students will initially observe and slowly, according to their skills and with preceptor supervision, sequentially increase their independence, applying the knowledge, skills, and professional attributes they are learning in the classroom. This will be their introduction to practice-based medicine and a precursor to their clinical year and clinical practice.

Clinical Problem Solving 2
CHS-PAS-5051-AA (Second year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 1.50 credits
Utilizing the same problem-based learning format as Clinical Problem Solving 1, students will develop patient case scenarios based on assigned clinical medicine topics in a small group format, utilizing concepts learned in Clinical Medicine, Physical Diagnosis, and Behavioral Science to formulate a differential diagnosis and final diagnosis. The second part of the course will be a research paper on a specific clinical question regarding the disease state encountered in the first part of the course. Students will use an evidence- based medicine approach to determining the most appropriate clinical intervention based on the most recent and valid scientific data.

Physical Diagnosis 1
CHS-PAS-5060-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture, Lab | 2.50 credits

This is the first of three sequential courses designed to prepare the student to elicit a complete medical history, perform a physical examination and appropriately document their findings. Students will be trained to demonstrate sensitivity to gender, age and cultural background in their interaction with patients. In addition to lecture and laboratory instruction, students will be afforded the opportunity to practice their history taking and examination technique during faculty-supervised hospital experiences. Lectures, DVDs and live demonstrations will be used. As each body system is reviewed, emphasis is placed on the understanding of the relationship between presenting signs and symptoms and their physiologic or pathophysiologic origins.

Physical Diagnosis 2
CHS-PAS-5061-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 1.50 credits

This course utilizes the competencies acquired in the Physical Diagnosis 1 course as the basis upon which to perform the focused medical history and physical examination. Course format will include lectures, small group practice sessions, and standardized patient encounters. Instruction is provided for accurate documentation of the focused history and physical, the SOAP note, as well as admission, progress, discharge, and surgical notes.

Physical Diagnosis 3
CHS-PAS-5062-AA (First year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 1.00 credits

This course utilizes the competencies acquired in the Physical Diagnosis 1 and 2 courses as the foundation upon which the student will continue to refine his/her skills in performing the focused medical history and physical examination. Additionally the course will facilitate critical thinking in the student approach to the patient with a physical complaint. Course format will include lectures, small group practice sessions, and a standardized patient encounter. Appropriate documentation of the focused history and physical as discussed in Physical Diagnosis 2 will be reinforced in this course.
 

Emergency Medicine
CHS-PAS-5100-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 1.50 credit

Approach to the diagnosis and management of common emergency conditions for primary care physician assistants. Topics include multiple trauma, chest trauma, abdominal trauma, shock, and cardiac emergencies.

Evidence-Based Practice
CHS-PAS-5101-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 1.00 credit

Review of basic statistics precedes statistical application to evidence-based theory, as it pertains to epidemiology, public health, and the practice of clinical medicine.  Provides an introduction in accessing computer based medically oriented information and evidence-based medicine databases.  Course emphasizes use of up-to-date evidence-based literature to validate and improve the practice of clinical medicine now and as a lifelong learner.  Students learn to identify, review and critique published literature relevant to their clinical setting. Specifically, students will learn to use medical literature as a tool for clinical decision-making.  This course prepares students for the emphasis placed on EBP in Clinical Medicine and Clinical Problem Solving.
 

Integrative Medicine
CHS-PAS-5102-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 1.00 credit

Integrative medicine views the patient holistically and focuses on the incorporation of complementary and alternative medicine into conventional medical practice. This course is designed to introduce the student to the various therapies associated with complementary and alternative medicine as well as to assess their safety and effectiveness. This course incorporates a service learning experience.


PA Seminar
CHS-PAS-5007-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 1.50 credits

This course is designed to introduce Physician Assistant (PA) students to pertinent issues of medical practice and the PA role in providing quality, patient centered care. The course is designed to expose the PA student to aspects of medicine and patient care that are not contained within the clinical medicine and science curricula. The student will receive specific instruction in professionalism, cross-cultural competency, diversity and public health. As a requirement of student participation in clinical experiences, instruction will be provided regarding the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and safety precaution guidelines related to blood-borne pathogens. Documentation, billing and coding, reimbursement, quality assurance, risk management, medicolegal issues and medical ethics will be discussed. The course will also touch on the history and evolution of the PA profession in U.S. medicine, the status, trends, and characteristics of PA health care providers, their education, regulation, practice patterns, external relations, and professional organizations. Issues related to PA health workforce policy are presented, along with aspects of PA salary and practice economics, specialization, PA political issues and the globalization of the PA concept.


Clinical Medicine 1
CHS-PAS-5130-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 4.50 credits

This is the first of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses. Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction in the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in normal physiology and pathophysiology and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 1 Course. Areas of study include: Dermatology; Head/Eyes/Ears/Nose/Throat; Ocular Medicine; Infectious Diseases, and Hematology/Oncology.
 

Clinical Medicine 2
CHS-PAS-5131-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 6.00 credits
This is the second of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses. Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction on the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in normal physiology and pathophysiology in Physiology and Pathophysiology I, and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 1. Areas of study include: Cardiology; Pulmonology; Endocrinology; Gastroenterology; Urology; Nephrology, and Rheumatology.
 

Clinical Medicine 3
CHS-PAS-5132-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 4.50 credits
This is the third of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses. Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction on the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in Physiology and Pathophysiology 1, and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 1. Areas of study include: Women's Health; Orthopedics; Neurology, and Geriatrics.
 

Advanced Clinical Skills 1
CHS-PAS-5140-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 2.50 credits

First of a two-course series and is the laboratory component of the Clinical Medicine 1, 2 and 3 courses. Through lectures, case discussion, demonstrations and practice sessions, students learn to use a variety of the diagnostic and treatment modalities used in primary care offices or performed via referral. This semester, these clinical skills include the instruction in, use of, or practice in procedures in the areas of Cardiology; Pulmonology; Nephrology/Urology and Gastroenterology.
 

Advanced Clinical Skills 2
CHS-PAS-5141-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 2.00 credits

Second of a two-course series teaching advanced clinical skills as the laboratory component of the Clinical Medicine 1, 2 and 3 courses. Through lectures, case discussion, demonstrations and practice sessions, students learn to use a variety of the diagnostic and treatment modalities used in primary care offices or performed via referral. These clinical skills include the instruction in, use of, or practice in procedures in the areas of: Men’s and Women’s Health, orthopedics/rheumatology, geriatrics and neurology. Students become skilled in the surgery-related techniques of suturing, preparing a sterile surgical field, gloving and gowning and other surgery suite procedures.  Splinting and casting procedures are taught. Students also become certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS).
 

Clinical Rotations
Clinic hours | 4.50 credits
In association with the Clinical Coordinator, each student will choose two rotations from a list of elective rotations (i.e., primary care, nephrology, interventional radiology, etc.) and be placed according to availability. No student will be required to acquire his/her own clinical rotation site.  If a student has a particular clinical rotation site he/she wishes to develop, this may be done in association with and at the discretion of the Clinical Coordinator.

  • CHS-PAS-6200-AA - Emergency Medicine

  • CHS-PAS-6201-AA - General Surgery

  • CHS-PAS-6202-AA - Internal Medicine

  • CHS-PAS-6203-AA - Prenatal Care/Women’s Health

  • CHS-PAS-6204-AA - Pediatrics

  • CHS-PAS-6206-AA - Behavioral/Mental Health 

  • CHS-PAS-6230-AA - Elective Rotation 1

  • CHS-PAS-6231-AA - Elective Rotation 2

  • CHS-PAS-6240-AA - Family Medicine/Primary Care 1

  • CHS-PAS-6241-AA - Family Medicine/Primary Care 2
     

Transition to Practice
CHS-PAS-5901-AA (Second year) | Lecture | 2.00 credits
Transition to Practice is designed to prepare the student to graduate and become a contributing member of the physician lead healthcare team.  Topics discussed will include NCCPA certification, including PANCE and PANRE, CME, professional liability and malpractice insurance. Licensure in both Pennsylvania and its surrounding states will be reviewed. In addition, to help facilitate in career planning, the student will be educated on how to find a job, prepare a CV, negotiate a contract and navigate the general credentialing process at healthcare institutions and selected issues in conflict resolution.
 

Capstone Project 1
CHS-PAS-5930-AA (Second year, spring quarter) | Lecture | 0.50 credit
The “Capstone Project” for the Salus University Physician Assistant Program is a two part faculty-guided independent study course.  Capstone Project 1 and Capstone Project 2 culminate in a graduate level paper, suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal, and a related Project Presentation.  Combined, these are part of a summative evaluation that will be used to measure cognitive and affective domains at a point near the completion of the program. 
 

Capstone Project 2
CHS-PAS-5931-AA (Third year) | Lecture | 0.50 credit
A student’s Capstone Project 2 is the culmination of the research begun during Capstone 1. In Capstone Project 2, an abstract literature review, discussion, recommendations and conclusions will be completed and will serve as the foundation for the oral presentation. This graduate research paper is presented to faculty, student peers and the Salus University Community as a requirement for graduation.