Gross Anatomy
CHS-PAS-5001-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture and Lab | 4.00 credits
This comprehensive, specifically designed course provides Physician Assistant students with an extensive background in gross human anatomy through lecture, laboratory and independent learning exercises. The course has a clinical emphasis and will provide foundational support for the clinical medicine, physical diagnosis and surgery courses. The laboratory portion consists of closely supervised full cadaver dissection, examination of prosected cadavers, models and diagnostic imaging, as well as state-of-the-art virtual anatomy imaging. 

Medical Microbiology and Genetics
CHS-PAS-5002-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

This course provides a systematic organ-based review of infectious disease agents and the principles and techniques employed in their laboratory diagnosis. It explores the protective mechanisms and response by the immune system in mounting defenses against common pathogens encountered in clinical practice. The course also introduces the basic concepts of genetics, inheritance patterns, genetic testing and screening and will correlate the effects of genetic alterations to clinical disease.

Behavioral Science
CHS-PAS-5003-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.50 credits

This course introduces the student to the normal and abnormal psychological development of pediatric, adult and geriatric patients. Through lectures and assigned readings, the student will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the evaluation and management of patients and their families with behavioral and mental health disorders. Instruction will include but is not limited to: the psychiatric interview, mood and personality disorders, somatoform/ factitious/ dissociative disorders, psychotic disorders, sexual orientation, substance abuse, domestic violence, and end of life care. The needs of vulnerable populations and management of psychiatric emergencies will also be considered. Learned skills are further honed in the CHS-PAS-6206 Behavioral/Mental Health clinical rotation course.

Acute and Invasive Medicine 
CHS-PAS-5008-AA (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 3.00 credits
This course is designed to prepare the Physician Assistant student for evaluating, managing, and providing treatment to patients in the acute care setting and well as management of the operative patient. General concepts of the acute management of unexpected injuries and illnesses as well as surgical concepts such as indications for surgical referral, pre-op patient assessment, principles of anesthesia, intra-operative management and post-op care and complications will be presented. The course emphasizes emergent diagnosis, stabilization, medical and surgical management, and emergency and operative procedures.  Evidence-based medicine practice is integrated throughout where appropriate. 

Physiology and Pathophysiology 1 
CHS-PAS-5030-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 3.00 credits 
This course is the first of three sequential courses that provides instruction in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of disease. The course integrates basic science concepts related to cellular physiology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, genetics and immunology. Diagnostic modalities are introduced where applicable. Organ system modules are aligned with those in the Clinical Medicine 1 and Pharmacology 1 courses.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 1
CHS-PAS-5030-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 3.00 credits
Provides a foundation for the study of diseases in the Clinical Medicine courses and begins with basic science modules in cellular physiology, biochemistry, pathology, and immunology. Students learn about organ systems with presentations emphasizing normal physiology of each system, followed by the pathophysiology of diseases important to that system. For each system, lecturers discuss normal function, cellular changes and pathological changes, including inflammatory aspects, infectious conditions and any neoplastic presentations where appropriate. In addition, an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie disease processes and diagnostic tests is also be included.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 2
CHS-PAS-5031-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.50 credits
This course is the second of three sequential courses that provides instruction in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of disease. The course integrates basic science concepts related to cellular physiology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, genetics and immunology. The normal physiologic changes associated with pregnancy are also explored. Diagnostic modalities are introduced where applicable. Organ system modules are aligned with those in the Clinical Medicine 2 and Pharmacology 2 courses.

Physiology and Pathophysiology 3
CHS-PAS-5032-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 2.00 credits
This course is the third of three sequential courses that provides instruction in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of.  The course integrates basic science concepts related to cellular physiology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, genetics and immunology. The normal physiologic changes associated with aging are also explored. Diagnostic modalities are introduced where applicable. Organ system modules are aligned with those in the Clinical Medicine 3 and Pharmacology 3 courses.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 1
CHS-PAS-5040-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

The first of three courses in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics, this course introduces students to the general principles of pharmacology and the application of these principles to patient care situations. Students learn the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, dosage forms and dose-response relationships. Classes of pharmaceuticals will be studied, with a focus on the mechanisms of drug action in different therapeutic classes, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions, the interaction of drugs with the disease state under treatment, polypharmacy, and reputable sources of information about drugs. The classes of pharmaceuticals parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 1.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 2 
CHS-PAS-5041-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 2.00 credits

This is the second of three courses in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics. Students are introduced to the general principles of pharmacology and the application of these principles to patient care situations. Students learn the principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics.  It provides an overview of dosage formulations and dose-response relationships. Instruction related to a drug’s mechanism of action, side effects, toxicity and contraindications. Drug interactions and polypharmacy will also be reviewed. The classes of pharmaceuticals parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 2.

Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 3 
CHS-PAS-5042-AA (First year, summer term) | Lecture | 1.50 credits
The third of three courses in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics, this course will introduce students to the general principles of pharmacology and the application of these principles to patient care situations. Students learn the principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics.  This course provides an overview of dosage formulations and dose-response relationships.  Instruction related to a drug’s mechanism of action, side effects, toxicity is provided. Drug interactions and polypharmacy will also be reviewed. The classes of pharmaceuticals parallel the body system being studied in Clinical Medicine 3.

Clinical Problem Solving 1
CHS-PAS-5050-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 3.50 credits
Using a problem-based learning format in a small group setting, students will learn to synthesize the medical knowledge and skills obtained throughout the curriculum and develop the critical thinking skills integral to clinical problem solving. Through the application of self-discovery and through integration of clinical reasoning, students will practice medical decision making based on evidence–based practice. Throughout the year, patient cases presented will relate to the organ systems studied in the Physiology and Pathophysiology, Clinical Medicine, and Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics courses.

Students will participate in a series of lectures on clinical laboratory medicine.  Lectures are designed to introduce and review common laboratory studies utilized in clinical practice.
Students will also participate in weekly “pre-clinical” experiences; applying the knowledge, skills, and professional attributes they are learning in the classroom. These shadowing experiences will have a primary care focus, but will also expose students to specialty practice and other ancillary services of medicine.  This serves as the introduction to practice-based medicine and a precursor to the clinical year of the program.

Clinical Problem Solving 2
CHS-PAS-5051-AA (Second year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 1.50 credits
Using a case-based learning approach, students will synthesize the medical knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum and develop the critical thinking skills integral to clinical problem solving. Each week students will be assigned required readings which will support the cases explored in class discussion sessions. Sessions will utilize a chief complaint to drive a variety of systems-based differential diagnoses. Through facilitated class discussion, students will choose a ‘clinical path’ to explore, describing the diagnostic and therapeutic options appropriate in the management of the disease processes.
 
Students will also be involved in weekly “pre-clinical” experiences. The experiences will have a primary care focus, but will also expose the students to primary and specialty practice and other ancillary services of medicine.  Students will initially observe and may, according to their skills and with preceptor supervision, sequentially increase their independence, applying the knowledge, skills, and professional attributes they are learning in the classroom. This serves as the introduction to practice-based medicine and a precursor to the clinical year of the program.

Physical Diagnosis 1
CHS-PAS-5060-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture, Lab | 2.50 credits

This is the first of three sequential courses designed to prepare the student to elicit a complete medical history, perform a physical examination and appropriately document their findings. Students will be trained to demonstrate sensitivity to gender, age and cultural background in their interaction with patients. In addition to lecture and laboratory instruction, students will be afforded the opportunity to practice their history taking and examination technique during faculty-supervised hospital experiences. Lectures, DVDs and live demonstrations will be used. As each body system is reviewed, emphasis is placed on the understanding of the relationship between presenting signs and symptoms and their physiologic or pathophysiologic origins.

Physical Diagnosis 2
CHS-PAS-5061-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 1.50 credits

This is the second of three sequential Physical Diagnosis courses designed to prepare the student to elicit a focused medical history, perform a physical examination and appropriately document their findings. Students will be trained to demonstrate sensitivity to gender, age and cultural background in their interaction with patients. Lectures, video links and live demonstrations will be used. As each body system is reviewed, emphasis is placed on the understanding of the relationship between presenting signs and symptoms and their physiologic or pathophysiologic origins.

Physical Diagnosis 3
CHS-PAS-5062-AA (First year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 1.00 credits

This is the third in a series of three courses that utilizes the competencies acquired in the Physical Diagnosis 1 and 2 courses as the foundation upon which the student will continue to refine his/her skills in performing the focused medical history and physical examination.  Additionally the course will facilitate critical thinking in the student approach to the patient with a physical complaint. Course format will include lectures, small group practice sessions, and standardized patient encounters,including the performance of male and female genitalia examinations on trained, standardized patients. Appropriate documentation of the focused history and physical as discussed in Physical Diagnosis 2 will be reinforced in this course.


Evidence-Based Practice
CHS-PAS-5101-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 1.00 credit

In this course, a review of basic statistics precedes the statistical application of evidence-based theory, as it pertains to epidemiology, public health, and the practice of clinical medicine.  Students are introduced to methods of accessing evidence-based medicine databases.  Students learn to identify, review and critique published literature, specifically to direct their clinical decision-making. The course emphasizes the use of current, evidence-based literature to validate and improve the practice of clinical medicine to promote lifelong learning. This course is preparation for the emphasis placed on evidence-based practice in the Clinical Medicine, Clinical-Problem Solving and Capstone Project courses. 
In an interprofessional, team-based environment and using a combination of onsite and online instruction, students enrolled in this course will work through assignments culminating in an interprofessional team project and oral presentation that will facilitate understanding of how the available evidence-based practice tools are applied in clinical training, clinical problem solving, and most importantly, clinical practice.
 

Integrative Medicine
CHS-PAS-5102-AA (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 1.00 credit

Integrative medicine views the patient holistically and focuses on the incorporation of complementary and alternative medicine into conventional medical practice. This course is designed to introduce the student to the various therapies associated with complementary and alternative medicine as well as to assess their safety and effectiveness.
 

Clinical Medicine 1
CHS-PAS-5130-AB (First year, fall semester) | Lecture | 4.50 credits

This is the first of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses.  Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction in the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in normal physiology and pathophysiology and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics I Course. Areas of study include:  Dermatology, Otolaryngology, Ocular Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Hematology/Oncology.
 

Clinical Medicine 2
CHS-PAS-5131-AB (First year, spring semester) | Lecture | 6.00 credits
This is the second of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses.  Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction in the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in normal physiology and pathophysiology and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 2 Course. Areas of study include:  Pulmonology, Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Urology, Rheumatology and Endocrinology.
 

Clinical Medicine 3
CHS-PAS-5132-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture | 4.50 credits
This is the third of three sequential Clinical Medicine courses. Using an organ-based systems approach, this course provides instruction on the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, differential diagnoses, assessment and management of common medical conditions. The course builds on lectures in normal physiology and pathophysiology and precedes an in-depth discussion of treatment modalities in Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics 3. Areas of study include: Gynecology, Obstetrics, Neurology/ Geriatrics, Orthopedics and Pediatrics.
 

Advanced Clinical Skills 1
CHS-PAS-5140-AA (First year, spring semester) | Lecture, Lab | 2.50 credits

This is the first of a two-course series that instructs the student in the diagnostic and technical skills utilized in clinical practice. Students engage in lectures, case discussions, demonstrations and practice sessions. Areas of study include ECG interpretation, radiographic imaging, indications, associated risks and the complications associated with diagnostic modalities and clinical procedures.
 

Advanced Clinical Skills 2
CHS-PAS-5141-AB (Second year, summer term) | Lecture, Lab | 2.00 credits

This is the second of a two-course series that instructs the student in the diagnostic and technical skills utilized in clinical practice. Students engage in lectures, case discussions, demonstrations and practice sessions. Areas of study include but are not limited to: slit lamp examination, suturing, surgical gowning and gloving, wound care and dressings, splinting and castings, venipuncture, injections and IV placements. Students become certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). Related risks and the complications associated with diagnostic modalities and clinical procedures will also be reviewed. 
 

Transition to Practice 
CHS-PAS-5901-AB (Third year, fall session) | Lecture | 2.00 credits 
This course is designed to prepare the second year PA student to make the transition from student to qualified clinician. Topics presented include an overview of the NCCPA certification and recertification process, ongoing CME requirements, licensure and credentialing. To help facilitate with career planning, Program faculty and invited speakers will work with students to prepare their curriculum vitae (CV), review aspects of the professional interview, contract negotiation, and financial planning in anticipation of loan repayment. A review of research methodologies will be presented in preparation of Capstone, as well as continued incorporation of evidence-based medicine into clinical practice. Toward the end of the clinical year there will be a focused review of medical content identified by the program as requiring greater strengthening through lectures and self-assessment in preparation of the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE). Additionally, the basic concepts of medical ethics and their application to contemporary clinical practice will be explored. 

Capstone Project 1
CHS-PAS-5930-AA (Second year, spring quarter) | Lecture | .50 credit
The “Capstone Project” for the Salus University Physician Assistant program is a two part faculty-guided independent study course.  Capstone Project 1 and Capstone Project 2 culminate in a graduate level paper, suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal, and a related Project Presentation.  Combined, these are part of a summative evaluation that will be used to measure cognitive and affective domains at a point near the completion of the program. 
In Capstone Project 1, under faculty guidance, a topic proposal (a research question or hypothesis) is developed, an initial outline created, a literature review is conducted, and the initial drafts of the introduction and methodology sections are completed. In Capstone Project 2, an abstract, body of the paper with discussion, and recommendations and conclusions will be completed and serve as the foundation for the Project Presentation.

Capstone Project 2 
CHS-PAS-5931-AA (Third year, fall session) | Lecture | .50 credit
The “Capstone Project” for the Salus University Physician Assistant program is a two part faculty-guided independent study course.  Capstone Project 2 continues the process started in Capstone Project 1 culminating in a graduate level paper, suitable for submission to a peer reviewed journal, and a related Project Presentation.  In Capstone Project 2, an abstract, the body of the paper with discussion, recommendations and conclusions will be completed and serve as the foundation for the Project Presentation. Combined, these are part of a summative evaluation tool that will be used to measure cognitive, motor, and affective domains at a point near the completion of the program.

The Project Presentation relays an in-depth presentation of the topic; outlining the critical thinking/critical decision-making, evidence-based process that led to the final diagnosis and research conclusions.  The presentation will also include any practice-based learning and systems based issues that were encountered by the student.  The professional manner in which the student delivers the presentation will be an important aspect of this event.

Emergency Medicine | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6200-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Emergency Medicine rotation takes place in a hospital emergency department and provides the student with exposure to urgent care as well as acute medical and surgical conditions. Students function as part of a multi-disciplinary team, working collaboratively with healthcare providers from all disciplines. Through supervised patient contact, the student gains experience in performing directed history and physical examinations, documenting patient encounters, and assessing and managing episodic illness. The student is also afforded opportunities to perform the clinical skills common within the Emergency Medicine setting.

Surgery | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6201-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Surgery rotation provides the student with exposure to the surgical setting, affording the opportunity to apply the basic principles of surgery acquired through the didactic Surgery course. Through practical experience, the student engages in the evaluation and management of patients encountering surgical problems. Students participate in operating room procedures and techniques, and will work collaboratively with the surgical team. Students are exposed to all aspects of the surgical process, including pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative patient care.

Internal Medicine | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6202-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Internal Medicine rotation takes place in a hospital and/or out-patient setting, exposing the student to the medical management of an adult patient population. Through supervised patient contact, the student gains experience in performing history and physical examinations, documenting patient encounters, and assessing and managing the acute and chronic illnesses commonly encountered in this medical setting. Students develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide patient-centered health education.
 
Prenatal Care/Women’s Health | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6203-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Women’s Health/Prenatal Care rotation takes place in a hospital, clinic and/or private practice setting, exposing the student to gynecologic and prenatal care. Through supervised patient contact the student gains experience in obtaining a women’s health history and performing the routine gynecologic examination and associated clinical skills. In addition to learning appropriate documentation of the patient encounter, the student acquires the knowledge and skills necessary to assess and manage the range of women’s health conditions throughout the reproductive lifespan.
 
Pediatrics | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6204-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Pediatrics rotation takes place in an outpatient and/or inpatient setting, exposing the student to the healthcare needs of the pediatric patient population. Through supervised patient contact, the student gains experience in performing pediatric history and physical examinations, ranging from neonate through teenage development. Students develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to interact with both the pediatric patient and caregiver, document patient encounters, and assess and manage both common pediatric problems, as well as acute illness. The student also is afforded the opportunity to become familiar with normal growth and development, immunization schedules, nutritional requirements, and anticipatory guidance.
 
Behavior/Mental Health | Clinical Rotation
CHS-PAS-6206-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program)  | 4.50 credits
The five (5) week Mental Health rotation takes place in an outpatient, and/or inpatient behavioral health facility. The student works collaboratively with the mental health team to evaluate and manage a range of behavioral/mental health issues. Through supervised patient contact, the student develops the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide ongoing and/or emergent support for this patient population. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the roles that socioeconomics, family health history, and social interactions play in the course of behavioral/mental health conditions. In addition, students develop an understanding of the barriers to treatment, as well as the support resources available within the community.

Family Medicine/Primary Care 1 | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6240-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
This is one of two, five (5) week Family Medicine rotations that take place in an outpatient primary care setting, exposing the student to the medical management of patients throughout their lifespan. Through supervised patient contact, the student gains experience in performing history and physical examinations, documenting patient encounters, and assessing and managing the acute and chronic illnesses commonly encountered in the primary care setting. Students also develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide patient-centered health education. 
 
Family Medicine/Primary Care 2 | Clinical Rotation
CHS-PAS-6241-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
This is the second of two five (5) week Family Medicine rotations that take place in an outpatient primary care setting, exposing the student to the medical management of patients throughout their lifespan. Through supervised patient contact, the student gains experience in performing history and physical examinations, documenting patient encounters, and assessing and managing the acute and chronic illnesses commonly encountered in the primary care setting. Students also develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide patient-centered health education.
 
Elective 1 | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6230-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
This is one of two five (5) week elective rotations available to the student. This rotation affords the student an opportunity to increase his/her knowledge base and skill in an area of clinical interest.
 
Elective 2 | Clinical Rotation 
CHS-PAS-6231-AA (Upon successful completion of the didactic year of the Program) | 4.50 credits
This is the second of two five (5) week elective rotations available to the student. This rotation affords the student an opportunity to increase his/her knowledge base and skill in an area of clinical interest.