Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease

The program is a two-year advanced residency program concentrated in the area of Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease at The Eye Institute of Salus University.

Working directly with the neuro-ophthalmic disease providers at the clinic, the resident receives intense training in the examination, diagnosis, treatment, and management of neuro-ophthalmic disease. It is expected that, upon successful completion of this program, the resident will be able to represent the profession of optometry in the specialty area of neuro-ophthalmic disease, participate in clinical and didactic activities at Schools and Colleges of Optometry and/or other medical institutions, educate students and colleagues, and provide excellent patient care. During the 1st year, the resident will participate in patient care areas involving neuro-ophthalmic disease, primary eye care, and other specialty services (glaucoma, anterior segment, retina, oculoplastics, vision impairment & rehabilitation), either in direct care, observation, or as a preceptor for students. The neuro-ophthalmic disease resident will also share on-call responsibilities with the other residents.  During the 2nd year of the program, the resident will participate in patient care primarily in the neuro-ophthalmic disease service and receive additional training in treating and managing neuro-ophthalmic disease through collaboration with experts in fields such as neurology, neuro-radiology, neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-surgery.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Residency Program in Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease at The Eye Institute of Salus University is to recruit qualified post-graduate optometrists; to train the optometrist in secondary patient care and gain exposure to tertiary specialty patient care through clinical management and co-management experiences in a broad range of neuro-ophthalmic disease; to provide an orientation and an ongoing didactic program throughout the year; to promote advancement of skills as an educator and self-learner; and to provide a suitable environment in which the resident can flourish. 
 

The nature of the patient population at The Eye Institute provides the foundation for the resident to hone his/her skills to a level of expertise in the specialty area of neuro-ophthalmic disease. The resident will achieve the objectives of the program through an appropriate level of collaboration with highly-trained expert specialty clinical faculty comprised of optometrists, as well as general and subspecialty physicians (both on-site and off-site), leading to the resident's clinical autonomy as a neuro-ophthalmic disease specialist.

Assignments

During the 1st year, the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease resident is typically assigned 40-44 hours per week, and an average of every other Saturday.  The Resident spends a total of three to four days in the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease Service, and the remaining time is in other patient care services, as well as in various educational activities. The resident will share on-call responsibilities with other residents in the program. The resident is also required to attend lectures and conferences which are scheduled outside of normal patient care responsibilities.

  • Emergency Eye Care - Under appropriate supervision, residents manage their own patients in the Emergency Service, where they see walk-in patients with ocular urgencies/emergencies.  Patients may be referred to our ophthalmology subspecialists. In addition, each resident is on-call weekends and evenings four to five weeks per program year.
  • Specialty Services
    • The resident is assigned to glaucoma, anterior segment, retina, oculoplastics, and vision impairment & rehabilitation services, in The Eye Institute on a rotating basis.
    • The resident may also have the opportunity to participate in other services in The Eye Institute and other area eye care venues.
  • The resident attends and participates in an educational program throughout the year, which includes conference and lectures, and is typically assigned to teach in a laboratory. They also participate in Grand Rounds presentations to fourth year students, fellow residents, and faculty members.  A conference/lecture schedule is distributed to the residents on a quarterly basis.  The Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease resident will be assigned to assist in teaching third year optometry students in the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease Course laboratory. 
  • Residents may be asked to conduct vision screenings off-campus and to participate in other College activities.  An additional stipend may be paid for these services.

During the 2nd year of the program, the resident will participate in patient care primarily in the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease service. During this year the resident will also further expand their skills in treating and managing neuro-ophthalmic disease through collaboration with highly-trained expert specialty clinical faculty comprised of optometrists, as well as general and subspecialty physicians in fields such as neurology, neuro-radiology, neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-surgery.  The resident will be expected to travel to off-site locations for portions of this training.

Resident attendance at the American Academy of Optometry (AAO) and/or North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (NANOS) conferences are required.

Salary & Benefits

Compensation for the first training year of the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease residency is equivalent to that of the traditional one year programs (see Salary & Benefits section). Compensation for the second training year of the program is adjusted accordingly as the resident’s skill level and autonomy are greater compared to the first training year.

2017-2019 Program:

  • 1st year:  $43,100
  • 2nd year: $80,000

Benefits include basic and major medical insurance, malpractice liability insurance (for practice at all TEI locations and affiliated community based activities), ten days paid leave, and twelve paid holidays on the College calendar.  Funding to attend one academic meeting during the year is typically provided.

Duration

The Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease residency is 104 weeks (2 years) in length. The first training year of the program begins on July 1st and eds on July 15th of the following year. The second training year of the program begins thereafter, on July 16th and ends on June 30th the following year.

Criteria for Completion

In order to successfully complete the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease residency, the following criteria must be met:
 
  1. Attendance at all clinical assignments
  2. Attendance at assigned lectures and conferences
  3. Acceptable level of performance in all areas of the program based on Resident evaluations
  4. Attendance of one optometric meeting of the Resident's choosing
  5. Presentation of a COPE-approved Grand Rounds lecture
  6. Submission of one peer reviewed abstract for a poster/presentation each year of the program
  7. Completion of a publishable quality manuscript 
A certificate of completion is awarded upon completion of the program.
 
Note: At this time, the institution is not actively pursuing residency candidates who currently have or are only eligible for the H1B VISA. Additionally, due to the specific 104 week duration of the Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease residency, candidates who are non-US citizens that eligible for a 12 month (52 week) Optional Practice Training (OPT) VISA under their F1 Student VISA are NOT eligible for the two year program. We acknowledge the limitations that this may cause for otherwise well qualified applicants, and we are dedicated to evaluating all viable options for the future.   

 

Sample Neuro-Ophthalmic Disease Resident Schedule (PDF)